GoodData XAE: The BI Game-Changer (2nd part)

For previous part (1/3), continue here


An honest look at your data

Moving forward with our previous example; uploading all of the data sources we use internally (from one side of the pond to the other) into an LDM makes each piece of information easily accessible in GoodData - that’s 18 datasets and 4 date dimensions.

Over this model, we can now build dashboards in which we watch how effective we are, compare the months with one another, compare people, different kinds of jobs, look at the costs, profits and so on.

Therefore, anything in our dashboard suits our needs exactly. No one dictated us how the program will work...this freedom is crucial for us. Thanks to it we can build anything that we want in GoodData – only our abilities matter in the question of succeeding and making the customer satisfied.

What’s a little bit tricky is that a dashboard like this can be built in anything. For now let’s focus on dashboards from KlipFolio. They are good, however they have one substantial “but” – all the visual components are objects that load information out of rigid, and predefined datasets. Someone designed these datasets exactly for the needs of the dashboard and made it not possible to tweak -  take two numbers out of two base tables … and watch their quotient in time. A month-to-date of this quotient can be forgotten immediately… and not even think about the situation in which there are “many to many” linkages. The great advantage of these BI products (they call themselves BI but we know the truth) is that they are attractive and pandering. However, one should not assume in the beginning that he has bought a diamond, when in actuality it cannot do much more than his Excel. (Just ask any woman her thoughts on cubic zirconia and you’ll see the same result).

Why is the world flooded with products that play on a little playground with walls plastered with cool visuals? I don’t know. What I know is that people are sailing on the “Cool, BigData analytics!” wave and they are hungry for anything that looks just a little like a report. Theme analytics can be done in a few days – transformation of transactions and counting of “Customer lifetime value”  is easy until everyone starts telling you their individual demands.

No one in the world except GoodData has the ability to manage analytics projects that are 100% free in their basis (the data model) and to let people do anything they want in these projects without having to be “low-level” data analysts and/or programmers. Bang!

So how does GoodData manage to do it?

Everyone is used to adding up an “A” column by inputting the formula “=SUM(A:A)”. In GoodData you add up the “A” column by inputting the formula “SELECT SUM(A)”. The language used to write all these formulas in GoodData is called MAQL – Multi-dimensional Analytical Query Language. It sounds terrifying but everyone was able to manage it – even Pavel Hacker has a Report Master diploma out of the Keboola Academy!

If you look back at my data model out of our internal projects you might say that you want the average number of hours out of one side of the data model but you want it filtered with the type of operation, put together according to the projects descriptions and the name of the client and you want to see only the operations that took place this weekend’s afternoons. All the metrics will look like “SELECT AVG(hours_entries) WHERE name(task) = cleaning". The multi-dimensionality of this language is hidden in the fact that you don’t have to deal with questions such as: what dimension is the name of the task in? What relation does it hold toward the number of worked hours? And furthermore – what relation does it hold towards the name of the client? GoodData (or the relations in the logical model that we design for our client) will solve everything for you.

So getting straight to the point, if I design a (denormalized) Excel table in which you find everything comfortably put together, no one who reads this will have trouble counting it. If we give you data divided by dimensions (and dimensions will often be other sources of data – just like outputs from our Czech and Canadian accounting systems) it would be much more complicated to process (most likely you will start adding in SQL like a mad person). Since the world cannot be described in one table (or maybe it does – key value pair... but you cannot work with that very much) the look into a lot of dimensions is substantial. Without it, you are just doing some little home arithmetic ☺.

Do I still have your attention? Now is almost the time to say “wow” because if you like to dig around in data, you are probably over the moon about our described situation by now ☺.

And to the Finale...

Creating a query language is the most complicated task to be solved in BI. GoodData on the other hand, uses a simple, yet effective language to mitigate any of these “complications” and express the questions you have about your data. Part 3 of our series will dive deeper into this language, known as MAQL, and its ability to easily derive insights hidden in your data.


For final part (3/3), continue here